10 Quirkiest Traditions to Kick Start New Year in London

When in London for the holiday season, there are surely numerous things to do for a merry time. But when it comes to New Year celebrations, we surely love to do this in a certain fashion. Be it rituals, parties, or ceremonial festivities, we never forget the time-survived traditions at the end of the year. In London, have you heard or participated in the ‘first footing’, where you let a strange man with particularly dark hair enter the house? If you haven’t heard of it, then don’t freak out already. The man carries bread, salt, and coal, signifying food, money, and warmth respectively.

But repeating the same holiday traditions every year? Where is the fun in that?

This is why we have compiled these choicest of traditions from the world over. Now batter-fry your New Year day into an extra crispy memory for life with the following customs:

Philippines:

Manigong Bagong Taon! They like circles and so do we, amongst other shapes. Although London has a lot of squares, why not participate in the famous Philippines New Year custom, even if standing in a square. Any circle shapes are a good luck sign on this day in Philippines. Dress patterns, food, coins, hats, we mean anything counts. How about going out on the road and revolving in circles? Amazing isn’t it? Also make sure the road has no traffic and keep some bandages handy. Just in case!

Denmark:

Godt Nytår! Did you hear a plate break? If not then make this New Year’s Eve interesting by converting a bunch of plates into driverless mini UFOs. All you need here is your friends’ doors and the sober ability to explain the Danish tradition reasonably. Go crash some old plates in front of your pal’s door and show them how much they mean to you.

Spain:

Feliz Año Nuevo! Now these grapes can never be sour. Start your New Year by eating 12 grapes, for every month to come, for good luck. Chew fast otherwise you will end up welcoming the New Year scrubbing your shirt too!

Ireland:

Bhliain Nua Sásta! Talking about New Year, we don’t want to miss telling you about the bread and the hammering. When we first heard of this Irish tradition, the immediate visual popping in our beautiful mind was hammering the bread against the wall. Oh imagine the crumbled smashed crumbs on the floor! Now you can follow this Irish tradition and give a sane explanation for it too – “To chase away the bad luck and welcome good spirits in with the New Year”.

Japan:

Akemashite Omedetou! Even if it is laughter attack or just a plain simple series of forced chuckles, that IS the Japanese New Year tradition. Roll in the New Year with a smile, buckets of hope or skates but there is no clarification for skates that’s all. Also skates were most probably just our idea.

Switzerland:

Glückliches Neues Jahr! This Swiss New Year tradition is strictly not for foodies. We just cannot see their heart break. Beware of the slippery floors as you drop the ice cream on the floor through the night. That’s one of their famous traditions to rope in the merry spirit of the brand new year in Switzerland. It is also one way to initiate massive floor scrubbing drive throughout the place next morning.

Central and South America:

Feliz Ano Novo! In the South and Central American countries, the New Year begins with a reminder of the undergarments. From red under wears, bright prints and yellow lingerie, take your pick from what brings you luck this New Year.

Belgium:

Gelukkig Nieuwjaar! This is one of our personal favourites. This unique New Year tradition of Belgium requires you to come across a cow. It is ideally with reference to Belgium farmers who never forget to wish their livestock, especially cows, on New Year. But when in London, cows or not, the animals also deserve your wishes and joys. Talking to the animals would never be so fun. Wishing cows has an added advantage too. You may get a reply back with a nodding ‘Moo’!

France:

Bonne Année! The French like to begin their New Year with pancakes. No not dropping this time. Eating and sharing the delectable and syrup-y pancakes is one of the traditional French customs of welcoming the New Year in good and sweet spirit. In case you want a party with the pancakes, you may book the famous London venue, Grange City Penthouse near River Thames with Thecitycollection.org.

Belarus:

Z Novym Hodam! We would strongly suggest this New Year tradition for all the single ladies. To find out who will be the next one wearing that shiny engagement ring, here is what to do. Get the ladies to form a line and then arrange a pile of corn in front of them. Acquire a matchmaker rooster (same as the regular rooster) and release the hungry bird in front of the ladies with corn. The pile it goes first to peck on, is the lucky pile or lady who will be buying the wedding magazines soon.

Warning: There is a good chance some of the ladies might run berserk watching the rooster approach. Please keep distance!

With such fun New Year traditions from around the globe, now spice up your new beginning into the year in style, or rather humour.

Send Enquiry
and get quotes from
venues

  • * mandatory fields
Venues
 
Recent News
News Archives
News Categories